Brazil World Cup Blog

News, analysis, history, and discussion on all things Verde-Amarela

Tag: Tactics

Futsal on the Field: How Tite’s Brazil Scores

My first article in over 1.5 years!  

Since Tite took over the reins of the national team, how has the Seleção scored?  Are they primarily a counter-attacking team, a la Dunga in 2010?[1]  Do they rely heavily on pressing and half-counters, like Scolari did until he and the entire squad dissolved into a nervous wreck?

Or has Tite brought back the intricate passing rhythms of Brazil’s golden age?

No, no, and no.

It was an interesting exercise, going back to analyze how Tite’s Brazil scored their goals.  To be honest, the results were not quite what I expected.  In my mind, I expected to find that half-counters were largely responsible for many goals, but the opposite turned out to be the case.

Here’s a breakdown of the 29 non-penalty goals Brazil scored in qualifiers after Tite took over: Continue reading

Guest Article: “What We Learned From Brazil’s Recent Coaches, Part 2: Rogério Micale and the Olympics” by Zetona

It has now been a year since Brazil won the gold medal in men’s football at the Olympic Games. It was one of Brazil’s most significant footballing accomplishments in years, particularly since Olympic gold was the last mountain the Seleção had yet to scale. Continue reading

Dunga’s False Nine Experiment

If you haven’t already, make sure you read Lisgarfund’s excellent breakdown on Brazil vs Holland from the 1998 World Cup.  In the meantime, here’s a little amuse-bouche to whet your appetite for Brazil vs Uruguay later tonight.  (A 3,000+ word amuse-bouche, because I’m addicted to words, apparently.)  Continue reading

From Nilton Santos to Marcelo: The Rise and Fall of the Attacking Full-back

From an aesthetic standpoint, the legacy of Brazilian football will be forever defined by words like samba and jogo bonito; by moments like Pele’s sombrero goal in the ’58 World Cup, or Carlos Alberto’s wonderful team goal that served as the final exclamation point to the 1970 tournament. Looking at it more analytically, Brazil’s legacy is all about the innovations they’ve made to football: defensive organization, team formation, individual expression, and collective interplay. But there’s one other innovation Brazil perhaps do not get enough credit for: the attacking full-back. Continue reading