Brazil World Cup Blog

News, analysis, history, and discussion on all things Verde-Amarela

Tag: 2018 World Cup cycle (page 1 of 3)

The Seleção Awards: 2014-2018

A World Cup cycle draws to a close, and before we concern ourselves with the buildup to the 2022 edition in Qatar, I thought it would be good to take a look back at the best, and worst, of Brazil over the last four years.

I’ve assembled a list of my personal choices, but I’ve also provided a poll with each category, to let you all vote on the highs and lows of the Seleção. If you have any categories you’d like to suggest, or nominees you think were egregiously snubbed, let me know in the comments.

Without further ado: Continue reading

World Cup 2018: Brazil vs Mexico Player Ratings

Player ratings for Brazil’s 2-0 victory against Mexico.   Continue reading

World Cup 2018: Brazil vs Mexico

Didn’t have time to write a real preview this weekend, but here are a few pre-match thoughts: Continue reading

World Cup 2018: Brazil vs Serbia

We enter the third and final match of group play with two teams needing a win.  Serbia, for any hope of qualification.  Brazil, to secure qualification – and as a balm for their own wounded psyche. Continue reading

Futsal on the Field: How Tite’s Brazil Scores

My first article in over 1.5 years!  

Since Tite took over the reins of the national team, how has the Seleção scored?  Are they primarily a counter-attacking team, a la Dunga in 2010?[1]  Do they rely heavily on pressing and half-counters, like Scolari did until he and the entire squad dissolved into a nervous wreck?

Or has Tite brought back the intricate passing rhythms of Brazil’s golden age?

No, no, and no.

It was an interesting exercise, going back to analyze how Tite’s Brazil scored their goals.  To be honest, the results were not quite what I expected.  In my mind, I expected to find that half-counters were largely responsible for many goals, but the opposite turned out to be the case.

Here’s a breakdown of the 29 non-penalty goals Brazil scored in qualifiers after Tite took over: Continue reading

Guest Article: “What We Learned From Brazil’s Recent Coaches, Part 2: Rogério Micale and the Olympics” by Zetona

It has now been a year since Brazil won the gold medal in men’s football at the Olympic Games. It was one of Brazil’s most significant footballing accomplishments in years, particularly since Olympic gold was the last mountain the Seleção had yet to scale. Continue reading

Guest Article: “What We Learned From Brazil’s Last Three Coaches, Part 1” by Zetona

Here’s a special Christmas treat for you, courtesy of our own Zetona!   Continue reading

3 behaviors of the Brazil Olympic Team the senior team should copy

It’s been well over a month since Brazil won its first Olympic gold medal.  Sadly, I haven’t had a chance to write about the tournament until now, when fans of the Seleção have already moved on to more pressing matters.

There were a lot of positives to take from Rogerio Micale’s side, including but not limited to: Continue reading

The Great Brazilian Autopsy – Deep-lying Forensics

This is the second article in a series I’m calling “The Great Brazilian Autopsy.”  In each article, we are going to dissect the corpse that is the Brazilian Men’s National Team, less to determine cause of death and more to determine what can be done to revive the body. Continue reading

Back to the Future

Dr Emmett DungaAs most readers know, I’ve been watching Brazil for a little over 25 years now.  In all that time, this edition of the Seleção might be the least inspiring, least star-studded, least talented side I’ve ever seen taken to a major tournament.[1]  Some of you can probably name worse ones.  The 2001 Copa America squad had previously held the dubious title of “worst tournament Seleção” of my lifetime, but that team had everything stacked against it.  Brazil’s best players, without exception, were all either injured or being rested, and Scolari had just barely taken charge.

The original team Dunga selected is probably better than that one, but it’s close.  For this and many other reasons, I’ve had a hard time working up much interest in the Centenario.

Until this week.  Continue reading

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